RSS

Montgomery Bus Boycott and Scottsboro Trials

04 Feb

Montgomery Bus Boycott Trials

Under the system of segregation used on Montgomery buses, white people who boarded the bus took seats in the front rows, filling the bus toward the back. Black people who boarded the bus took seats in the back rows, filling the bus toward the front. Eventually, the two sections would meet, and the bus would be full. If other black people boarded the bus, they were required to stand. If another white person boarded the bus, then everyone in the black row nearest the front had to get up and stand, so that a new row for white people could be created. Often when boarding the buses, black people were required to pay at the front, get off, and reenter the bus through a separate door at the back. On some occasions bus drivers would drive away before black passengers were able to reboard. National City Lines owned the Montgomery Bus Line at the time of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

 

Scottsboro Trials

The Scottsboro Boys were nine black teenage boys accused of rape in Alabama in 1931. The landmark set of legal cases from this incident deal with racism and a basic American right: the Right to a fair trial. The case includes a frame up, all-white jury, rushed trials, an attempted lynching, angry mob, and miscarriage of justice.

 

The Scottsboro Trials

Took place in the 1930s

Took place in northern Alabama

Began with a charge of rape made by white women against African American men

The poor white status of the accusers was a critical issue.

A central figure was a heroic judge, a member of the Alabama Bar who overturned a guilty jury verdict against African American men.

This judge went against public sentiment in trying to protect the rights of the African American defendants.

The first juries failed to include any African Americans, a situation which causeed the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the guilty verdict.

The jury ignored evidence, for example, that the women suffered no injuries.

Attitudes about Southern women and poor whites complicated the trial.

Tom Robinson’s Trial

Occurs in the 1930s

Takes place in southern Alabama

Begins with a charge of rape made by a white woman against an African American man

The poor white status of Mayella is a critical issue.

A central figure is Atticus, lawyer, legislator and member of the Alabama Bar, who defends an African American man.

Atticus arouses anger in the communtiy in trying to defend Tom Robinson.

The verdict is rendered by a jury of poor white residents of Old Sarum.

The jury ignores evidence, for example, that Tom has a useless left arm.

Attitudes about Southern women and poor whites complicate the trial of Tom Robinson.


The Author and the Book

Nelle Harper Lee, the author of To Kill a Mockingbird, had many childhood experiences which are similar to those of her narrator, Scout Finch.

Harper Lee’s Childhood

Grew up in 1930s – rural southern Alabama town

Father – Amasa Lee – attorney who served in state legislature in Alabama

Older brother and young neighbor (Truman Capote) are playmates

Harper Lee – an avid reader

Six years old when Scottsboro trials were meticulously covered in state and local newspapers

Scout Finch’s Childhood

Grew up in 1930s – rural southern Alabama town

Father – Atticus Finch – attorney who served in state legislature in Alabama

Older brother and young neighbor (Dill) are playmates

Scout reads before she enters school; reads Mobile Register newspaper in first grade

Six years old when the trial of Tom Robinson takes place

Sources: http://library.thinkquest.org/12111/SG/SG5.html

Advertisements
 
3 Comments

Posted by on February 4, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

3 responses to “Montgomery Bus Boycott and Scottsboro Trials

  1. Jack Tan

    February 4, 2011 at 4:12 pm

    Good Job Wen Feng! I like the way you put your points across, by using charts. I think this is a special and innovative way, as I look through all the other classmate’s blogs, I think that this way of organising your information attracts the reader’s attention the most! I agree with your points too! All in all, good job with your blog!
    Jack Tan 2O307

     
  2. Mrs. Anu

    February 5, 2011 at 11:05 am

    Good work Wen Feng by crediting the websited for the information that you have taken you have managed to remain free of plagiarising. I would have preferred a little bit of your emotions thrown in as well, as in your opinion about these events.

     
  3. Lam Sze Tung

    February 5, 2011 at 6:44 pm

    I absolutely agree with Jack . The points are easy to read and well put forth 🙂 Good job 😀

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: